Boehner’s Blunder: How Suing Obama Can Destroy the Separation of Powers

“The problem with what the president is doing is that he’s not simply posing a danger to the constitutional system. He is becoming the very danger the Constitution was designed to avoid. That is the concentration of power in a single branch.”  December 3, 2013, testimony of George Washington University Law Professor Jonathan Turley before the U.S. House.

The Bill of Rights protects our liberties, but the Bill of Rights is not our only Constitutional protection. The Constitution’s separation of powers is less well-known but no less important. Obama brags openly that he will ignore the separation of powers. He will use his pen and his phone to bypass Congress. He will institute his personal rule over the United States.

John Boehner is acting to push back Obama’s violation of the separation of powers. Unfortunately, he is ignoring the means provided by the Constitution for doing so. He is suing Obama instead. As explained below, if Boehner’s suit succeeds, it will permanently destroy the Constitution’s separation of powers.
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Steve Jobs Meets Sophocles

In a previous post (JoePa Meets Nero), I considered the tendency of people to damn the entirety of man’s life’s work because of the evil he committed or allowed. I began wondering, though, if this river ever flows the other way.  Are there people who have made such vast positive contributions that their negative actions are disregarded or ignored?  I found 2 such examples separated by almost 2500 years with surprisingly similar stories: Steve Jobs and Sophocles.  Both were universally acknowledged as geniuses in their own day.  Both were evidently quite lousy people and cruel to those closest to them.  In both cases, people overlooked the latter because of the former. Continue reading